Remember Jewish Krasnobrod - Genealogy Group

Pronunciation: Kraz-noe-brod

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The first Jewish settlers in Krasnobrod were recorded in 1576. They developed a synagogue,
meit haMidrash, and cemetery. In the first half of the 19th century, the Hasidic movement
was thriving in Krasnobrod. A few Hasidic schools operated in the town and remained under
the influence of the tzaddiks from Radzyn, Turzysk, Gora Kalwarii and Belz.

After the outbreak of the First World War, a substantial number of men from Krasnobrod were
conscripted to the Russian army. In this period some groups of the Jewish people left the
town to find work. In the 1920s and 1930s the majority of Jews in Krasnobrod lived by
trading and crafts but also farming, leasing, and financial operations. A few Jewish
families also rendered services to the local and holiday tourists. In 1919 and 1920, some
riots directed against the Jewish population took place. During the Polish-Russian war,
when on Aug. 29, 1920 the Ukrainian troops entered the town, two Jewish inhabitants were
killed and another 50 were wounded. The Ukrainian soldiers looted the Jewish property.

During the interwar period there was a synagogue in the town, two prayer houses, a mikvah,
a ritual bath and a cemetery. Numerous cheders functioned in the town, two private schools
existed -– Yavne and Tarbut -- run by Zionistic organizations. In the 1930s antisemitism
started to grow stronger and so was the economic crisis that affected Poland at that time.
This led to subsequent migration waves of Jews at the end of the 30s who migrated to Israel.

In September 1939 the town was bombarded and largely devastated, many Krasnobrod citizens were
killed then, including almost 200 Jews. Upon entering the town by the German army, persecutions
of Jewish inhabitants began. They were all crowded in a few houses that survived the air raid
and the people subject to the forced labor were hired to tarmac the roads and to clear of
rubble of the ruined town. In spring 1940 a group of 32 Jewish workers from Krasnobrod were
sent to the east to build fortifications across the border with Russia. On Dec. 24, 1940,
S.S. men who were stationed near Krasnobrod plundered Jewish possessions in large scale. In
spring 1941, displaced Jewish people from Lodz and Wloclawek were sent to the Krasnobrod ghetto.

The ghetto dissolution started early in the summer of 1942 during Shavuot. The gestapo executed
a few members of the Judenrat at that time. All the Jews from the town were gathered in the
building behind the Dominican monastery and then transported in train cars to the Belzec Death
Camp. A few brave souls escaped back to their houses in town, however the S.S. came back to the
town in July and burnt all the houses where Jews were hiding, resulting in additional deaths.

On Oct. 26, 1942, the remaining Jewish inhabitants of Krasnobrod were shot by a firing squad
and the Germans transported a part of them to Zamosc. In February 1943 the Germans conducted
a large-scale action to catch all the Jews hiding in the nearby forests and agricultural farms.
The Nazis also destroyed the synagogue and the cemetery in Krasnobrod, Poland.

Please review the site content below. Zachor - We Remember.

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[Jewish Partisans in Poland's Lublin District]
[Partial listing of Krasnik Survivors]
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Learn more at the Belzec Remembrance Project


The destroyed shul, Krasnobrod.


An unidentified Jewish couple from the town.


Students from Krasnobrod in their Freiheit youth Zionist group.


Students from Krasnobrod, 1930s.


From the Yizkor book for Krasnobrod.


From the Yizkor book for Krasnobrod.


From the Yizkor book for Krasnobrod.


LINKS

Join the Krasnobrod group on Facebook!


Town of Krasnobrod:

- Coming Soon

Holocaust Survivors of Krasnobrod:

- Szlomo Babat
- Aron Borg
- Avraham Borg
- Gitla Borg
- Hantsie Borg
- Moshe Aryeh Borg
- Shabtai Borg
- Shike Borg
- Yitzhak Borg
- Hersh Brener
- Nathaniel Brener
- (unknown) Davidowitz
- Helen Elbaum
- David Elbaum
- Hena Sarah Elbaum
- Mira Frymerman
- Moniek Frymerman
- Ester Kam Glickman
- Shmuel Gurtler
- Yocheved Gurtler Nuss
- Gitla Knobel Belman
- Miriam Kopel Blumenthal
- Seymor Kupitz
- Rivka Lam Burstein
- Risza Lerer
- Esther Lewinson Lerner
- Froim Lochfeld
- Yakov Lochfeld
- Abraham Rajf
- Mordechai Rapoport
- Eliyahu Rind
- Shmuel Rind
- Moshe Untzig (Uncyk)
- Tera Wajsblat
- Shlomo Zonszajn

Rabbis of Krasnobrod:

Moshe Borg
Avraham Freund
Meir Sustzek
Mordko Gurtler
Moshe Soifer
Yitzchak Szlesinger

Genealogy:

- Jewish Records Indexing Poland - Krasnobrod
- Jewish Vital Records in the Polish State Archives

Remember Your Family:

- The DNA Shoah Project: Connecting Descendants
- Central Judaica Database - Museum of History of Polish Jews
- Grandchildren of Holocaust Survivors on Facebook
- Guide to the YIVO Archives
- Holocaust News/Events from Generations of the Shoah Int'l
- Holocaust Survivors and Victims Database
- JewishGen Family Finder
- JewishGen Holocaust Database
- JRI-Poland: Search for Your Family
- Museum of History of Polish Jews Introduction
- Yad Vashem: Search for Your Family
- Yad Vashem: Submit Names of Your Family Members
- Yad Vashem Requests Photos of Shoah Survivors and Families


CONTACTS

U.S.: Aaron, LublinJewish@gmail.com


HOT LINKS

Chelm.freeyellow.com Index



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